Acorn Computers
Sections
Museum Hold Tight! Photos
Walking Weather
Acorn Commodore Sinclair PCN
Calculating
Acorn Computers
Introduction
Acorn Atom
BBC-B
BBC Master
Electron
Electron Plus 1
Electron Plus 3
Filing
Peripherals
Software
Books
Links
Commodore
Sinclair
 
 
 
Acorn Atom
Acorn Atom
Computer
BBC-B
BBC-B
Computers
BBC Master
BBC Master
Computer
Electron
Electron
Computers
     
Electron Plus 1
Electron Plus 1
Interace
Electron Plus 3
Electron Plus 3
Interface
Filing
Filing
Disc and Tape
Peripherals
Other
Peripherals
Software
Software
Disc and Tape
Books
Books
and Magazines
 
Programs
Downloads
Atom
Programs
Downloads
BBC B
Programs
Downloads
Electron
Links
Related
Links
     
Welcome to bob-mockford.co.uk/acorn
www.bob-mockford.co.uk - the new home of
Bob Mockford Online
Click an image above or a link below for details
Acorn Atom Acorn's first complete home computer.
BBC-B The computer for school and home.
BBC Master A super Beeb.
Electron The alternative for home users.
Electron Plus 1 Adding joysticks and cartridges to the Electron.
Electron Plus 3 Adding a disk drive to the Electron.
Filing Tape recorders and disk drives.
Peripherals Other add-ons.
Software The games in my collection.
Books Using the Beeb and the Electron.
Atom Downloads A selection of BASIC programs for emulators or to type in.
BBC-B Downloads A selection of BASIC programs for emulators or to type in.
Electron Downloads A selection of BASIC programs for emulators or to type in.
Links Emulators for Atom, Beeb and Electron.
Acorn Computers
Acorn's first product for the consumer market was the Atom, launched in 1980. It was available as a kit or ready built. This was to be followed by the Proton, which would be aimed at the home user but could easily be upgraded for industrial or scientific use.
Also in 1980, the BBC had proposed a computer literacy project which would be based on an a single computer. Specifications were drawn up and a suitable partner was sought. The UK government owned a company called Newbury Laboratories which was developing a computer called the New Brain, but it soon became clear that the computer would not be ready in time for the project.
The Proton impressed the BBC enough for them to award the contract to Acorn and so in 1982 the BBC Micro was born. The BBC A had 16KB memory while the BBC B had 32. Both versions had more options for connecting to the outside world than most home computers of that time and there was room on the circuit board to add further chips.
While schools up and down the country acquired large numbers of BBC Micros, the price was much higher than its rivals and it was physically a big machine. As a result, a simpler, smaller version was developed in 1983, named the Electron. This sold in large numbers but 1984 saw a collapse in the home computer market and Acorn being rescued by Olivetti. Following this, the BBC Master was launched and was a success but this would mark the end of development for eight-bit computers. Acorn would go on to produce excellent 16 bit computers for home and business.
Although my Acorn collection is not large, it has given me a lot of fun and is an important link to those early days of home computing.
Acorn Atom >>
 
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