Hold Tight! - Fareham tales
 
Chapter 4
 
Page 21
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Hold Tight!
Chapter 4
Winchester
18 Fare game?
19 Ten bob fiddler
20 Back to front
21 Fareham tales
22 Baby blues
23 Winter blues
24 Double trouble
25 Bus companies
26 Get lost
27 Time to move
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
Chapters
1 Beginnings
2 Learning
3 Getting Away
4 Winchester
5 Freedom
6 Southampton
7 City Transport
 
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Fareham was one of the towns we visited regularly from Winchester with the 69 route operated by crews from both depots and the 'out-station', a group of crews and vehicles stationed away from any depot, at Bishop's Waltham.
One of the Fareham conductors frequently complained about the language in the canteen. Despite the fact that he had worked there for a few years, he had never got used to it. But no matter how much he complained, the other men and, of course, the women continued to swear. Most of us just joined in but he eventually went to the depot superintendent. The response, "It's a xxxxing bus depot canteen, what the xxxx do you expect me to do about it?" was hardly what he wanted to hear.
A Fareham conductor with a very different background knew exactly what to do when he had a late night bus load of drunken sailors. He called the provost (navy police). They took the drunks and the bus away with them. The bus was returned next day and parked in the middle of the garage with a sign saying 'Do Not Touch'. It gleamed, it sparkled, you could use it as a shaving mirror. The guys had been up all night cleaning and polishing every last inch inside and out!
The nearest I ever came to something like this was on a journey to Andover on an old single deck bus. I dropped a coin on the floor, bent down to retrieve it and when I stood up I caught my money bag under a seat and tipped out all the contents. I picked up as much as I could but other hands were grabbing what they could too. The route passed through the army camps at Barton Stacey where most of the passengers got off. When I cashed up at the end of the day I was several pounds short.
A few days later I was called into the office expecting to be in trouble for this but to my surprise I was handed an envelope full of money. One of the passengers had apparently been a higher rank of some sort who had taken the names of the soldiers who had helped themselves. He later made them empty out their pockets and had relieved them of all their small change. Instead of losing the money from my wages I actually made a profit on the deal.
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