The Commodore Years - Hardware
<< Introduction
Software >>
Sections
Museum Hold Tight! Photos
Walking Weather
Acorn Commodore Sinclair PCN
Calculating
Hardware
Contents
Click any image
for details
 
Commodore Years
Introduction
Hardware
Software
Paperwork
Magazines
Links
 
 
Calculators
Electronic
Calculators
Watches
LED and LCD
Watches
Games
Games
Consols
PETs / CBMs
PET / CBM
Models
VIC 20
VIC 20
Computer
Commodore 64
Commodore 64
Computer
Commodore 64C
Commodore 64C
Computer
Commodore SX-64
SX-64
Portable
Commodore 16
Commodore 16
Computer
Commodore Plus/4
Plus/4
Computer
Commodore 128
Commodore 128
Computer
Commodore 128D
Commodore 128D
Computer
Datasettes
Datassette
Recorders
Quick Data Drives
Quick Data
Drives
Commodore 1541 Disk Drives
1541
Disk Drives
Commodore 1541 Mk2
1541-II
Disk Drives
Other Disk Drives
Other
Disk Drives
Printers
Dot Matrix
Printers
Monitors
Commodore
Monitors
VIC 20 expansion
Expansion
Vic 20
Commodore 64 expansion
Expansion
Commodore 64
Game Controllers
Game
Controllers
Power Supplies
Power Supply
Units
etcetera ..... other items
Other
Items
My Commodore collection.
In the late 1970s I decided I wanted a computer. Not for playing games but for "serious" use: for checking my bank account, keeping a diary and word processing. I knew little about the subject and there were few shops that sold them. The models on display seemed unpromising. Had I seen the Commodore PET at this time I would certainly have wanted one. Here was a "proper" computer but sadly it wasn't being promoted locally.
In 1982 I finally took the plunge and bought my first VIC-20 - and quickly found it didn't do what I wanted. However, it did let me experiment with writing programs in Basic and I was hooked. The launch of the Commodore 64 came at just the right moment. With its 40 column display, a pair of 1541 disk drives (one of which I had converted before delivery to drive 09) and a 1525 printer I had a new and consuming hobby, More disk drives and better printers followed. I continued using 64s well into the 1990s even after I bought my first (non Commodore) PC.
Some of the other items in my collection have been added since. I eventually got my PET, in fact three of them. I have a particular soft spot for the SX-64, although I may never try to take it outside my home. I haven't included any Amigas as my only experience has been with the eight-bit models. And to me, these sum up the Commodore years. A diverse set of designs, some popular some not, a story of huge success and equal failure.
In its time Commodore brought home computing to millions who might otherwise never have joined the technological revolution. Commodore's place in history is not often properly recognised. The company may have gone, but the Commodore name lives on with many of its products still in people's homes around the world.
Here you can see mine .....
<< Introduction Top of the Page